Green Infrastructure? A Symposium on the Technologies of Nature and the Natures of Technology
May
10
9:30 AM09:30

Green Infrastructure? A Symposium on the Technologies of Nature and the Natures of Technology

Green Infrastructure? A Symposium on the Technologies of Nature and the Natures of Technology

Convened by Allison Lassiter & Nikhil Anand

Sponsored by the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities

Cosponsored by the Department of Anthropology, SAS and Department of City and Regional Planning, PennDesign


Schedule:

9:30-10:00: Introductory remarks- Allison Lassiter and Nikhil Anand, Penn

10:00-10:45 : James Wescoat, MIT. “Blue-Green Infrastructure in Boston and Bombay: An Initial Exploration of Long-Term Comparative Methods.”

Discussant: Nikhil Anand, Penn

10:45-11:00: Coffee

11:00-11:45: Franco Montalto, Drexel. “Enhancing Urban Communities Through Applied, Multifunctional Green Water Infrastructure Research- From Science to Practice.”

Discussant: Stephanie Chiorean, Penn Water Center

11:45-12:30: Kessie Alexandre, Princeton. “When It Rains: Resilience, Redevelopment, Stormwater Infrastructure in the Postindustrial Cityscape”

Discussant: Billy Fleming, Penn

12:30-1:30: Lunch

1:30-2:15: Daniel Brent, Penn State. “An economic perspective on green infrastructure”

Discussant: Allison Lassiter, Penn

2:15-3:00: Sasha Eisenman, Temple. “The ups and downs of green infrastructure: Topographic variation in plant health within bioswales along I-95”

Discussant: Nick Pevzner, Penn

3:00-3:15: Coffee

3:15-4:00: Edgar Westerhof, Arcadis. “Preparing for the Flood – Meeting Global Climate Challenges with Co-Benefits”-

Discussant: Kim Thomas, Penn State

4:00-5:00: Closing Discussion

5:00-6:00: Reception

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River Research Seminar at Glen Foerd: John Brady, "Local and Historical Boats of the Delaware River and Bay" + Boating on the Poquessing Creek
Apr
27
12:00 PM12:00

River Research Seminar at Glen Foerd: John Brady, "Local and Historical Boats of the Delaware River and Bay" + Boating on the Poquessing Creek

River Research Seminar at Glen Foerd

  • John Brady, President and CEO, Independence Seaport Museum
  • Boating on the Poquessing Creek to Follow
     

John Brady, "Local and Historical Boats of the Delaware River and Bay" 

The Seaport Museum houses a collection of boats built in the time period between the end of the Civil War until the introduction of fiberglass as a building material in the mid 20th century. They are all rowing and sailing boats so when the internal combustion engine took over the work boats many of these became the foundation of boats built for sport or recreation under sail as well as the basis for the development of new forms suited to the internal combustion engine. This varied collection tells us a great deal about the society that created the individual boats as well as the natural environment and the craft of boat building itself, topics well worth exploring. 

John Brady has worked in maritime preservation for 35 years, building and restoring traditional craft at Independence Seaport Museum, South Street Seaport, Philadelphia Maritime Museum and the Philadelphia Ship Preservation Guild. John was appointed President and CEO of the Seaport Museum in 2011 and has expanded the Museum’s history-focused mission to include science education and on-water programming. John serves as an authority on boat and ship construction on the Delaware River and along the New Jersey coast. He continues to sail a wide variety of traditional boats, as he has for 48 years.


Founded in April 2016, the Schuylkill River and Urban Waters Corps is an informal collective of academic, non-profit, civic and community organizations. Based in Philadelphia, we are devoted to exploring and stewarding urban waters past and present. The Corps is currently fostering collaborations in other cities in the U.S., including Mumbai and New York, and we are building a digital archive for our members' varied work: contributing, collecting, and curating oral histories; developing a variety of tours, both on-line and in-person; measuring air and water quality; and designing and building an array of citizen science and public humanities projects to discover and document the waters--and invite considerations of how they will exist in the future.

@SchuylkillCorps

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Faculty Working Group – Paul Saint-Amour, University of Pennsylvania
Apr
26
8:45 AM08:45

Faculty Working Group – Paul Saint-Amour, University of Pennsylvania

Faculty Working Group – Breakfast Meeting

To Face the Fossil
Paul K. Saint-Amour, Walter H. and Leonore C. Professor in the Humanities, University of Pennsylvania

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Emmanuel Levinas, theorist of the face-to-face as the central ethical encounter, famously said “I don’t know if a snake has a face.” If not even a snake is possessed of ethical faciality, what about the fossil of a snake? Or the fossil of a trilobite? Yet as little as one might imagine being in a face-to-face ethical encounter with the permineralized remains of a millennia-dead member of an extinct species of Arthropod, such encounters have happened. This talk explores two such encounters in nineteenth-century Britain, one in a painting by a minor Pre-Raphaelite named William Dyce, the other in an early Thomas Hardy novel. How, I’ll ask, might fossils not only open a portal to deep time but also prompt, in the beholder, a profound ethical disorientation in the present?

 


Paul K. Saint-Amour is Walter H. and Leonore C. Professor in the Humanities at the University of Pennsylvania, where he teaches nineteenth- and twentieth-century British literature. He wrote The Copywrights: Intellectual Property and the Literary Imagination (2003), which won the MLA Prize for a First Book. He edited the collection Modernism and Copyright (2011) and co-edits, with Jessica Berman, the Modernist Latitudes series at Columbia University Press. His latest book, Tense Future: Modernism, Total War, Encyclopedic Form(2015), won the Modernist Studies Book Prize and the MLA’s Matei Calinescu Award. His teaching and scholarship are now taking up questions of conflict, temporality, and scale in the environmental humanities.

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Center for Media at Risk – Launch Symposium
Apr
19
to Apr 29

Center for Media at Risk – Launch Symposium

"What is Media at Risk?" is a cross-disciplinary conference bringing together media practitioners, media scholars and media assist organizations to define what "media at risk" means globally in circumstances of political intimidation and what can be done to resist it.

Given the proliferating nature of creeping authoritarianism around the world, these efforts will help highlight Penn’s mission to explain more fully what political intimidation in the media – in documentary, journalism, entertainment and the digital environment – looks like worldwide. Additional information and registration details to come.

 


Center for Media at Risk

Towards a Free and Critical Media Environment

The Center for Media at Risk is devoted to fostering free and critical media practice and scholarship. Political intimidation threatens media practitioners worldwide, while disinformation campaigns destabilize public trust in an unprecedented fashion. The Center will provide a global hub for practical and scholarly strategizing in response to the threatening political conditions that currently undermine the global media environment. Understanding how media practitioners work under threatening political conditions—from explicit totalitarian regimes to circumstances of creeping authoritarianism—rests at the core of the university’s mission.

The Center for Media at Risk will provide the educational tools necessary for identifying the changing parameters of political intimidation across the global media landscape.

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Rising Waters: A Workshop on Urban Waterscapes
Apr
17
8:30 AM08:30

Rising Waters: A Workshop on Urban Waterscapes

  • Perry World House, Second Floor, Conference Room 224 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Rising Waters: A Workshop on Urban Waterscapes

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Cities have long been made through colonial and then modernist efforts to tame the unruly relations between land and water. In port cities as diverse as Philadelphia and Mumbai, engineers have drained wetlands and built river embankments and sea walls to keep waters at bay. These projects have produced particular kinds of ground for the development of industry, commerce and social life as well as particular kinds of water– deepened harbors for shipping vessels, buried creeks, forgotten wells, and waste sinks. While these projects have made urban life possible, they have also produced raced and classed geographies of inequality in the city.  

Today, these stabilized (and not always innocuous) relations are being challenged by the rising waters of climate change.  As climate scientists project a future unlike times past, the increased propensity for severe storm surges and disrupted weather patterns have unsettled historic relations between land and water in cities. Climate events threaten industries, transportation infrastructures and marginalized residents settled in former wetlands, and they promise to exacerbate social inequalities and further squeeze non-human natures. In these uncertain and toxic times, how might we make space for social justice and non-human natures in and along rising urban waters? This expansive, collaborative project seeks to explore the futures of river and coastal cities in a time where the lines between land and water are muddied all around us.

Rising Waters: A Workshop on Urban Waterscapes convenes leading scholars whose work delves into multiple sites of inquiry – especially along seas and rivers, and around regions impacted by superstorms – toward a critical understanding of the changing conditions of living with water.

Part 1: Introductory Remarks (Nikhil Anand and Bethany Wiggin, Rising Waters Co-Directors, Penn); Dilip da Cunha, Columbia, "Ocean of Wetness." (Respondent: Kathy Morrison, Penn); Liz Koslov, MIT, "Avoiding Climate Change: Adaptation Amidst Denial After Hurricane Sandy."

Part 2: Kian Goh, UCLA, "Sinking City Waterscapes: The Hydro-Politics of Flooding in Jakarta" (Respondent: Simon Richter, Penn); Dominic Boyer, Rice, "Another Storm is Coming: Alluvial Awareness in Post-Harvey Houston" (Respondent: Eugenie Birch, Penn).


Full Schedule

8:30 am: Breakfast

9:00 am: Welcome & Introductions

9:15-10:15 am: Dilip da Cunha, Columbia, “Ocean of Wetness”

Response: Kathy Morrison, Penn

10:15-11:15 am: Liz Koslov, M.I.T., “Avoiding Climate Change: Adaptation Amidst Denial After Hurricane Sandy”

Response: Nick Pevzner, Penn

11:15–11:30 am: Break

11:30 am–12:30: Kian Goh, UCLA, Sinking City Waterscapes: The Hydro-Politics of Flooding in Jakarta

Response: Simon Richter, Penn

12:30-1:30 pm: Lunch

1:30-2:30: Dominic Boyer, Rice, “Another Storm is Coming: Alluvial Awareness in Post-Harvey Houston”

Response: Genie Birch, Penn

2:30-3:30 pm, Debjani Bhattacharyya, Drexel University, “Law and Ecological Variability: Notes from Bengal”

Response: Etienne Benson, Penn

3:30–3:45 pm: Break

3:145-4:30 pm: Closing Conversation, Nikhil Anand and Bethany Wiggin, Penn

4:30–5:30 pm, Reception

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Rising Waters is supported by a new Penn Arts and Sciences program that encourages faculty to explore innovative ways of applying their expertise and working with students to address societal challenges. The initiative, called “Making a Difference in Diverse Communities,” provides funding to support teams of faculty and students in multidisciplinary projects that combine coursework, research, and service to address issues of diversity and inequality at the local, national, and international level. Rising Waters is one of five featured inaugural projects.

Project Co-Directors: Dr. Nikhil Anand, Assistant Professor, School of Arts & Sciences, Department of Anthropology, and Dr. Bethany Wiggin, Associate Professor, School of Arts & Sciences, Department of Germanic Languages and Literatures, Graduate Group Member in Comparative Literature and English, and Faculty Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities

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River Research Seminar – BEEN HERE: Community Narratives on Nature & Displacement
Apr
13
12:00 PM12:00

River Research Seminar – BEEN HERE: Community Narratives on Nature & Displacement

Schuylkill Corps River Research Seminar

BEEN HERE: Community Narratives on Nature & Displacement

  • Althea Baird, Interdisciplinary Artist, 2017 SouthWest Roots Artist in Residence
  • Marie Alarcon, MultiMedia Artist, 2017 SouthWest Roots Artist in Residence
  • Sophia Poe, Artist, Family & Community Advocate, Woodland Academy
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In 2017, SouthWest Roots Artist Catalyst Resident Artists Marie
Alarcon, Althea Baird, Ash Richards, Darlene Devore and Jennifer
Turnbull, developed a multidisciplinary project at Bartram’s Gardens
with the help of Community Liaison Sophia Poe. The culminating event
was a multichannel video installation showcasing Bartram's Garden’s
neighbors and friends as they perform everyday acts of art and
movement, highlighting the creative power that has long existed in
communities, with a focus on the intimate and personal relationships
between place and the communities that interact within it, outside of
the involvement of institutions.


Marie Alarcón is a multimedia artist based in Philadelphia, PA.  She
has worked in community media as an educator and producer for numerous
arts and educational organizations over the past 10 years. She has a
B.A. in Documentary and Postcolonial Studies from The Evergreen State
College, Olympia, WA, and an MFA from the University of Pennsylvania,
School of Art and Design.

Althea Baird is a multidisciplinary artist working in Philadelphia.
For nine years she has facilitated community collaborations and
political education workshops through the collectives BARE TEETH and
the Spatial Liberation Project. She uses oral history, collaborative
writing and expressive movement as forms of knowledge-sharing between
people who share space and survival.

Sophia Poe is a mother, artist, advocate, liaison, organizer and
undergrad student studying Social Work at Temple University. She has
dedicated over 6 years of her professional career to providing quality
services to families and community residents in the Southwest area of
Philadelphia. Her goal is to promote self-love, empowerment, and
healing amongst women of color through the power of the arts.
 


Complimentary Lunch is Provided.

Founded in April 2016, the Schuylkill River and Urban Waters Corps is an informal collective of academic, non-profit, civic and community organizations. Based in Philadelphia, we are devoted to exploring and stewarding urban waters past and present. The Corps is currently fostering collaborations in other cities in the U.S., including Mumbai and New York, and we are building a digital archive for our members' varied work: contributing, collecting, and curating oral histories; developing a variety of tours, both on-line and in-person; measuring air and water quality; and designing and building an array of citizen science and public humanities projects to discover and document the waters--and invite considerations of how they will exist in the future.

@SchuylkillCorps

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Faculty Working Group: Grace Sanders Johnson, University of Pennsylvania
Apr
12
8:45 AM08:45

Faculty Working Group: Grace Sanders Johnson, University of Pennsylvania

Faculty Working Group – Breakfast Meeting

Grace Sanders Johnson, Assistant Professor, Africana Studies, University of Pennsylvania

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Harriet’s Hike: Ecological Literacy for Girls

Harriet’s Hike pairs Harriet Tubman’s legacy as an Underground Railroad “conductor,” spatial navigator, and environmental savant in the nineteenth century Delaware Valley region with current socio-environmental conditions, storytelling, and ecological literacy for girls and elder women in Philadelphia. Tubman’s journeys necessitated an intimate relationship to the land, extensive community networks, and literacy. Partnered with the Beckett Life Center—a housing complex and resource center—in North Philadelphia, Harriet’s Hike translates these nineteenth century concerns to the twenty-first century by combining a community call for literacy, intergenerational mentoring, and environmental justice, with community cartography, urban gardening, vegetation study, debris disposal/recycling, and walking, as the women prepare for the annual culminating project of a 27 mile walk from Philadelphia to the Tubman-Garrett Park in Wilmington, DE.

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Teach-In: Post-Carbon Futures in a Fact-Challenged Present
Apr
4
5:00 PM17:00

Teach-In: Post-Carbon Futures in a Fact-Challenged Present

Post-Carbon Futures in a Fact-Challenged Present

 Participants at  COP22 , a follow-up on the Paris climate agreement, stage a public show of support for climate negotiations in Marrakech, Morocco, on Nov. 18. (AP Photo/David Keyton)

Participants at COP22, a follow-up on the Paris climate agreement, stage a public show of support for climate negotiations in Marrakech, Morocco, on Nov. 18. (AP Photo/David Keyton)

Domestic American politics have long played a role in climate negotiations, including in the current federal administration’s announced plan to withdraw from the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement. In contrast to the guarded optimism of climate change activists after COP21 in Paris, the emotional climate after the recent COP23 in Bonn was notably gloomy.

Nonetheless, state and city leaders insist #WeAreStillIn, the hashtag used by a coalition of 2,500 leaders from city halls, state houses, boardrooms, and college campuses. who have signed the “We Are Still In” declaration. In the vacuum created by a lack of federal leadership, this coalition and others are organizing across local contexts to bring about a systematic response to urgent environmental issues.

As we study and engage the present and future of the carbon economy, this roundtable brings together experts on energy transitions past and present as well as energy and health policy at the state and local level.

Panelists:

  • Brian Black – Distinguished Professor, History and Environmental Studies, Penn State Altoona, author of Petrolia
  • Christine Knapp, Director, City of Philadelphia Office of Sustainability
  • Pouné Saberi – Physicians for Social Responsibility
  • John Quigley – Director, Center for Environment, Energy, and Economy, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology

Moderated by Bethany Wiggin, Associate Professor of German, Founding Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities

Reception to immediately follow hosted by the Wolf Humanities Center.

Presented by Penn Program in Environmental Humanities, Office of the Provost, Faculty Senate, Wolf Humanities Center, and Penn Sustainability.

Post-Carbon Futures in a Fact-Challenged Present is presented as a part of the 2018 Penn Teach-In.

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PPEH Faculty Working Group: Thom van Dooren, University of Sydney, Australia
Mar
29
8:45 AM08:45

PPEH Faculty Working Group: Thom van Dooren, University of Sydney, Australia

Faculty Working Group – Breakfast Meeting

Making Worlds with Crows: A Multispecies Ethics
Thom van Dooren, University of Sydney, Australia
Associate Professor and Australian Research Council Future Fellow, Department of Gender and Cultural Studies University of Sydney

 Source: Courtesy of Thom van Dooren

Source: Courtesy of Thom van Dooren

Ubiquitous in their global presence, crows are now found almost everywhere that people are: from critically endangered island crows living in disappearing forests to abundant urban species finding new ways to exploit changing cities. In this way, crows offer a broad range of instructive sites for exploring the challenges and possibilities of multispecies life in the context of escalating processes of globalisation, urbanisation, climate change, and extinction. This talk offers an overview of a recently completed monograph that focuses on changing human/crow relationships in five key sites in an effort to develop approaches and practices for a situated, attentive, multispecies, ethics.


Thom van Dooren is Associate Professor and Australian Research Council Future Fellow (2017-2021) in the Department of Gender and Cultural Studies at the University of Sydney, and founding co-editor of the journal Environmental Humanities (Duke University Press). His research and writing focuses on some of the many philosophical, ethical, cultural, and political issues that arise in the context of species extinctions and human entanglements with threatened species and places. He is the author of Flight Ways: Life and Loss at the Edge of Extinction (2014), Making Worlds With Crows: A Multispecies Ethics (2018), and co-editor of Extinction Studies: Stories of Time, Death, and Generations (2017), all published by Columbia University Press. www.thomvandooren.org
 

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Environmental Science and the Post-Apocalyptic Novel: Lydia Millet in Conversation with James English and Bethany Wiggin
Mar
28
5:00 PM17:00

Environmental Science and the Post-Apocalyptic Novel: Lydia Millet in Conversation with James English and Bethany Wiggin

Environmental Science and the Post-Apocalyptic Novel

Lydia Millet
Novelist and Conservationist, Center for Biological Diversity
in conversation with

James English
Director, Wolf Humanities Center; John Welsh Centennial Professor of English

Bethany Wiggin
Founding Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities; Associate Professor of German

Cosponsored by the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities and the Department of English.

The prolific, unpredictable, award-winning novelist Lydia Millet manages also to lead a professional life as a conservationist at the Center for Biological Diversity. For the Forum on Afterlives, Millet will read from her latest work and discuss her unusual double role as scientist and novelist. In our era of ever more destructive climate change, are the themes of apocalypse and extinction migrating from science fiction into realism? How does Millet make room in her novels for so much humor and whimsy alongside their political and environmental horrors? 

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Lydia Millet is a novelist and short-story writer known for her dark humor, idiosyncratic characters and language, and strong interest in the relationship between humans and other animals. Sometimes called a "novelist of ideas," Millet won the PEN-USA award for fiction for her early novel My Happy Life (2002), and she has been a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize as well as a Guggenheim fellow, among other honors.

Millet’s writing has been described as “…flawlessly beautiful, reaching for an experience that precedes language itself.” Millet has written books and stories that range from the philosophical to the satirical, on matters including the inventors of the atom bomb, and political culture under George H.W. Bush.

As well as being a novelist, Millet holds a degree in environmental policy and works for the Center for Biological Diversity, an organization focused on protecting endangered species. She shares with Barbara Kingsolver a passionate worry about wildlife’s future: Her 2012 novel “Magnificence” features a bizarre museum of taxidermied extinct animals, and the mermaids in her “Mermaids in Paradise” (2014) are the last of their kind.

Born in Boston, Millet grew up in Toronto and now lives outside Tucson, Arizona with her two children, where she writes and works in wildlife conservation. Sweet Lamb of Heaven, a psychological thriller about a woman in hiding from her estranged husband, was published in May 2016.

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Environments of Modernity: A University of Pennsylvania Symposium
Mar
22
to Mar 23

Environments of Modernity: A University of Pennsylvania Symposium

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What does it mean to think about environment in the twenty-first century? Recent work across the humanities and social sciences has begun to destabilize our idea of the environment as a singular, universal, and natural context for life. As scholars envision a more radically interdependent relationship between the human and nonhuman, the meanings ascribed to terms like environment and environmentalismare shifting in ways linked to practices of capitalism and imperialism; dynamics of race, class, gender, sexuality, ability, and religion; and intensified digital networks and proliferating media objects.

“Environments of Modernity” brings together an interdisciplinary group of scholars to assess the cultural, historical, and political affordances of the environment concept for contemporary thought. As we come to appreciate the interdependence of humanity and environment, scholars are called upon to rethink the conditions of political and historical agency in the modern world. If the idea of a singular environment depends on the untenable idea of a singular humanity, then how can humanists and social scientists theorize environmentalisms responsive to the conflicting needs of individuals, communities, and species?

The symposium aims to develop new approaches that re-conceptualize both of its central terms,  environment and modernity. What kinds of structures and phenomena comprise an environment—the natural world, media technologies and infrastructures, a mood or a feeling in the air? How do culture and aesthetic representation shape our understanding of environmental forces, and to what extent do cultural practices not only represent but also produce the environments of modernity?

For more information: https://environmentsofmodernity.wordpress.com/


Schedule:

Thursday, March 22nd at the Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut St.:

5:00-5:15 pm — Opening Remarks: Conference Organizers

5:15 – 6:30 pm — Opening Presentation: John Durham Peters

6:30 – 7:00 pm — Drinks Reception, Slought Foundation

Friday, March 23rd at the Slought Foundation, 4017 Walnut St.:

9:00 – 9:30 am — Breakfast

9:30 – 10:30 am — Speaker: Supriya Nair

10:30 – 11:30 am — Speaker: Kate Marshall

11:30 – 11:45 am — Coffee Break

11:45 – 1:00 pm — Graduate Student Roundtable

1:00 – 2:00 pm — Lunch Break (lunch not provided at conference)

2:00 – 3:00 pm — Speaker: Melody Jue

3:00 – 4:00 pm — Speaker: Robin Nagle

4:00 – 4:15 pm — Coffee Break

4:15 – 5:30 pm — Closing Roundtable with Penn Faculty

Participants: Etienne Benson, Rahul Mukherjee, Paul Saint-Amour, Bethany Wiggin

5:30 – 7:00 pm — Catered Dinner for Attendees, Slought Foundation


Organizers

Natalie Amleshi
Micah Del Rosario
Sam Waterman
Nicole Welk-Joerger
Aylin Malcolm
Aaron Bartels-Swindells
Nick Millman
Orchid Tierney

Co-Sponsored by: Penn Arts and Sciences, Slought Foundation, GAPSA, Wolf Humanities Center, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities, Price Lab for Digital Humanities, University of Pennsylvania Cinema Studies,  University of Pennsylvania English Department, the Modernism and Twentieth Century Reading Group, the Latitudes Reading Group, and the Anthropocene Reading Group.

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River Research Seminar – Water Ways with Meg Lemieur + Bri Barton
Mar
16
12:00 PM12:00

River Research Seminar – Water Ways with Meg Lemieur + Bri Barton

Schuylkill Corps River Research Seminar

Water Ways

  • Meg Lemieur: Artist, Environmental Advocate, associated with E.D.G.E.

  • Bri Barton: Illustrator, Garden Educator, associated with Soil Generation

  Water Ways , Meg Lemieur and Bri Barton

Water Ways, Meg Lemieur and Bri Barton

Water Ways is a collaboratively-drawn series of highly detailed pen and ink illustrations telling the story of water and the effects that the natural gas industry has on Pennsylvania, New Jersey and the surrounding area. Each illustration consists of dozens of small vignettes that highlight people's struggles with companies and our own government as they strive to protect the water and land on which we all survive. Water Ways is created by Bri Barton and Meg Lemieur.


Meg Lemieur: Through my art, I am interested in juxtaposing nature with the human experience while exploring the themes of social and environmental justice with a hopeful perspective and questioning sensibility. Through my work as an environmental activist over the past eight years here in Philadelphia, I have learned to use my art as both a form of expression and communication. Manifesting in illustration, performance, story sharing, and other art forms, my work continues to educate, inspire and connect communities and individuals who yearn to make the world a better place. 

Bri Barton is an artist, witch, plant grower, and organizer. Her work elevates and embodies racial and environmental justice, anti-imperial history, earth worship, and defiant celebrations of life. Bri graduated Valedictorian from Moore College of Art in 2011 where she double-majored in Fine Art and Curatorial Studies. She uses paint, ink, shadows, and light to create art that is collaborative, participatory, and informative. Bri is a founding member of the multi-disciplinary painting troupe, ROMPUS. She is also a member of Soil Generation, a black-led coalition of Philadelphia organizations and individuals who support community-managed green space, gardens, and farms through advocacy, grassroots organizing, and education. Bri is the creator of participatory projects hub, Everybody Colors, and the writer and illustrator of Everything Dies! A Coloring Book About Life!. She loves learning, teaching, climbing trees, and composting systems of oppression.


Complimentary Lunch is Provided.

Founded in April 2016, the Schuylkill River and Urban Waters Corps is an informal collective of academic, non-profit, civic and community organizations. Based in Philadelphia, we are devoted to exploring and stewarding urban waters past and present. The Corps is currently fostering collaborations in other cities in the U.S., including Mumbai and New York, and we are building a digital archive for our members' varied work: contributing, collecting, and curating oral histories; developing a variety of tours, both on-line and in-person; measuring air and water quality; and designing and building an array of citizen science and public humanities projects to discover and document the waters--and invite considerations of how they will exist in the future.

@SchuylkillCorps

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PPEH Faculty Working Group + Rising Waters: Malini Ranganathan, American University
Mar
15
8:45 AM08:45

PPEH Faculty Working Group + Rising Waters: Malini Ranganathan, American University

Faculty Working Group – Breakfast Meeting

Dispossession, Liberalism, and the Coloniality of Urban Ecologies
Malini Ranganathan
Assistant Professor, School of International Service, American University

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How do we understand lead poisoning in water pipes, land dispossession and evictions, and real estate speculation on wetlands—all of which disproportionately affect the life chances of racial, ethnic, and caste minorities—as projects of empire and liberalism? Drawing on urban historiography and archival and ethnographic work in India and the US, this talk seeks to expose how race and other forms of difference subtly encoded within liberal urban policy and planning have had, and continue to have, a bearing on urban ecologies. Drawing on critical race and postcolonial theory, the talk considers if and how liberalism can be recovered and repurposed for emancipatory urban futures.


Malini Ranganathan is Assistant Professor at the School of International Service at American University in Washington, DC. Her research focuses on the relationship between urban housing, land, and water infrastructures, as well as struggles for environmental and spatial justice in India and the US. She has a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley in Energy and Resources with a Designated Emphasis in Global Metropolitan Studies. She is a 2017-2019 co-recipient of an American Council of Learned Societies-Andrew W Mellon Foundation grant titled “Corruption Plots, Imagined Publics: The Ethics of Space in the Millennial City”. Her work is published in Antipode, Progress in Human Geography, Annals of American Association of Geographers, and other venues. 

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River Research Seminar – Sharece Blakney and Starr Herr-Cardillo
Feb
23
12:00 PM12:00

River Research Seminar – Sharece Blakney and Starr Herr-Cardillo

Schuylkill Corps River Research Seminar

  • Sharece Blakney, Graduate Student in the History MA program at Rutgers University-Camden
  • Starr Herr-Cardillo, Historic Preservationist/Writer
 Joshua Rowley Watson, "The Woodlands from the Rocks at Gray's Ferry with the Lower Bridge", 1816, watercolor. Philadelphia Museum of Art.  

Joshua Rowley Watson, "The Woodlands from the Rocks at Gray's Ferry with the Lower Bridge", 1816, watercolor. Philadelphia Museum of Art.  


Sharece Blakney, Graduate Student in the History MA program at Rutgers University-Camden

Equally Free With Myself: Slavery, Manumission, and Indentured Servitude in Kingsessing Township, 1780-1850


Between 1780 and 1850, the black community of Kingsessing Township experienced wealth, poverty, freedom, and enslavement. Using primary source documents, "Equally Free with Myself" explores slavery, manumission, and indentured servitude from the perspective of the black community of Kingsessing. Historical analysis reveals the ripple effect that various forms of being unfree have had on the development of the black community in southwest Philadelphia. The impact of slavery has left historians with many webs that connect the 'peculiar institution' to communities of color and race relations today.

 

Starr Herr-Cardillo, Historic Preservationist/Writer

Bridging the Schuylkill: Cultivating collaboration through shared history

In the colonial and early national eras, the Lower Schuylkill was home to some of the most important ornamental and botanical gardens in America. Safeguarded by early preservation efforts as the riverfront industrialized, two key players in this story—The Woodlands and Bartram’s Garden—are now recognized as National Historic Landmark Districts, bastions of Philadelphia’s horticultural legacy that live on as parks, historic sites, and important community anchors in their respective neighborhoods. Delving into the history of both sites reveals a number of fascinating historical relationships and connections that are being brought to the public through creative and collaborative programming.


Complimentary Lunch is Provided.

Founded in April 2016, the Schuylkill River and Urban Waters Corps is an informal collective of academic, non-profit, civic and community organizations. Based in Philadelphia, we are devoted to exploring and stewarding urban waters past and present. The Corps is currently fostering collaborations in other cities in the U.S., including Mumbai and New York, and we are building a digital archive for our members' varied work: contributing, collecting, and curating oral histories; developing a variety of tours, both on-line and in-person; measuring air and water quality; and designing and building an array of citizen science and public humanities projects to discover and document the waters--and invite considerations of how they will exist in the future.

@SchuylkillCorps

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