Ecotopian Toolkit for WetLand: Mandy Katz and Devid Hewitt
Apr
29
1:30 pm13:30

Ecotopian Toolkit for WetLand: Mandy Katz and Devid Hewitt

  • Bartram's Garden

After a successful 2016 pilot The PPEH Lab at Wetland returns as the focus of our Ecotopian Tools for WetLand public event series. Seven winning artists will facilitate community events to jam out prototypes for living on warmer waters, and your contributions are desired!

On Saturday, April 29, from 1:30-3:00PM, micro-grant winner Mandy Katz and Devid Hewitt will lead a walk, identifying plants along the River at Bartram's Garden. 

Read more about our adventures on our Floating Wetland blog!

This spring, several art and design installations will extend from Bartram's Garden Community Boathouse. Moored to the banks, and addressing the shoreline, they aim to influence the surrounding area. These installations are the result of an environmental design competition - Ecotopian Tools for WetLand - which began as a call for proposals and juried selection process. Winning toolmakers include Cecily Anderson, Joanne Douglas, Carolyn Hesse, Gabriel Kaprielian, Mandy Katz, Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco. Projects are situated to buoy the legacies of Bartram's Garden and WetLand - a boat that serves as a gathering place, art project and science lab- and timed to jibe with the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities' Ecotopian Toolkit conference, April 13-15

These prototypes for ecotopian tools will introduce strategies for inhabitants of the Lower Schuylkill watershed to consider as we learn to adapt and, in some cases, to float on warmer waters. Cecily Anderson will develop a map of the Lower Schuylkill that is receptive to user's inputs. Joanne Douglas will use fibers and dyes to register environmental information along the river bank. Carolyn Hesse will adapt a floating, mirror-like installation that will animate the river's surface. Mandy Katz plans to develop a comprehensive field guide to plants of the Lower Schuylkill in consultation with the Philadelphia Botanical Society. Gabriel Kaprielian will create floating habitat pods that cultivate plants and attract river-dwelling animals. Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco will build a "bio-pool" - a passive floating form that will cleanse the river water it gathers. 

A series of weekend workshops at Bartram's Garden from April 29-June3 will feature each tool with the aim of promoting stewardship of the Lower Schuylkill River in and around Bartram’s Garden. Through these public events and related programs of PPEH, we invite you to participate in exploring how we all might learn to float–and to live and thrive–on warming and rising river waters. Climate prediction models agree that Philadelphia is becoming hotter and wetter. How can we best adapt to the higher temperatures and other extreme weather events that increasingly make up the new normal?  

To learn more about WetLand, read the Press Release, review Instructions for Living with WetLand and its Emergency Operations Procedures handbook.

Ecotopian Toolkit for WetLand: Carolyn Hesse
May
10
10:00 am10:00

Ecotopian Toolkit for WetLand: Carolyn Hesse

  • Bartram's Garden

After a successful 2016 pilot The PPEH Lab at Wetland returns as the focus of our Ecotopian Tools for WetLand public event series. Seven winning artists will facilitate community events to jam out prototypes for living on warmer waters, and your contributions are desired!

On Wednesday, May 10, micro-grant winner Carolyn Hesse will debut SUSPEND, visible from Gray's Ferry. 

Read more about our adventures on our Floating Wetland blog!

This spring, several art and design installations will extend from Bartram's Garden Community Boathouse. Moored to the banks, and addressing the shoreline, they aim to influence the surrounding area. These installations are the result of an environmental design competition - Ecotopian Tools for WetLand - which began as a call for proposals and juried selection process. Winning toolmakers include Cecily Anderson, Joanne Douglas, Carolyn Hesse, Gabriel Kaprielian, Mandy Katz, Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco. Projects are situated to buoy the legacies of Bartram's Garden and WetLand - a boat that serves as a gathering place, art project and science lab- and timed to jibe with the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities' Ecotopian Toolkit conference, April 13-15

These prototypes for ecotopian tools will introduce strategies for inhabitants of the Lower Schuylkill watershed to consider as we learn to adapt and, in some cases, to float on warmer waters. Cecily Anderson will develop a map of the Lower Schuylkill that is receptive to user's inputs. Joanne Douglas will use fibers and dyes to register environmental information along the river bank. Carolyn Hesse will adapt a floating, mirror-like installation that will animate the river's surface. Mandy Katz plans to develop a comprehensive field guide to plants of the Lower Schuylkill in consultation with the Philadelphia Botanical Society. Gabriel Kaprielian will create floating habitat pods that cultivate plants and attract river-dwelling animals. Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco will build a "bio-pool" - a passive floating form that will cleanse the river water it gathers. 

A series of weekend workshops at Bartram's Garden from April 29-June3 will feature each tool with the aim of promoting stewardship of the Lower Schuylkill River in and around Bartram’s Garden. Through these public events and related programs of PPEH, we invite you to participate in exploring how we all might learn to float–and to live and thrive–on warming and rising river waters. Climate prediction models agree that Philadelphia is becoming hotter and wetter. How can we best adapt to the higher temperatures and other extreme weather events that increasingly make up the new normal?  

To learn more about WetLand, read the Press Release, review Instructions for Living with WetLand and its Emergency Operations Procedures handbook.

Research Rivers Seminar: Jason Kelly (IUPUI)
May
12
12:00 pm12:00

Research Rivers Seminar: Jason Kelly (IUPUI)

Join us for the seventh meeting of the Research Rivers Seminar of the semester on May 15, 2017. 

This week's presentation will be given by Jason Kelly (IUPUI).

Location: 12-1:30p in the Meyerson Conference Room, 2nd Floor, Van Pelt Library, Penn

 

ResearchRivers.jpeg

In tandem with other LSRCorps initiatives, the River Research Seminar begins meeting is a collaborative place-based research seminar designed to build a core of regional scholars whose work explores the Schuylkill River and Philadelphia’s urban waters, connecting them across disciplines from hydrology to history. The seminar works closely with community partners whose collaboration also informs the seminar’s research questions and priorities.

The seminar is convened by Laurie Allen (Assistant Director of Digital Scholarship, Penn Libraries), Peter DeCarlo (Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry, Drexel University), Danielle Redden (Director of River Programs, Bartram’s Garden), and Bethany Wiggin (Associate Professor of German and Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities).

For more information contact director@ppehlab.org. 

Ecotopian Toolkit for Wetland: Gabriel Kaprielian
May
13
11:00 am11:00

Ecotopian Toolkit for Wetland: Gabriel Kaprielian

  • Bartram's Garden

After a successful 2016 pilot The PPEH Lab at Wetland returns as the focus of our Ecotopian Tools for WetLand public event series. Seven winning artists will facilitate community events to jam out prototypes for living on warmer waters, and your contributions are desired!

On Saturday, May 13, micro-grant winner Gabriel Kaprielian will lead a workshop about eco-pods. 

Read more about our adventures on our Floating Wetland blog!

This spring, several art and design installations will extend from Bartram's Garden Community Boathouse. Moored to the banks, and addressing the shoreline, they aim to influence the surrounding area. These installations are the result of an environmental design competition - Ecotopian Tools for WetLand - which began as a call for proposals and juried selection process. Winning toolmakers include Cecily Anderson, Joanne Douglas, Carolyn Hesse, Gabriel Kaprielian, Mandy Katz, Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco. Projects are situated to buoy the legacies of Bartram's Garden and WetLand - a boat that serves as a gathering place, art project and science lab- and timed to jibe with the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities' Ecotopian Toolkit conference, April 13-15

These prototypes for ecotopian tools will introduce strategies for inhabitants of the Lower Schuylkill watershed to consider as we learn to adapt and, in some cases, to float on warmer waters. Cecily Anderson will develop a map of the Lower Schuylkill that is receptive to user's inputs. Joanne Douglas will use fibers and dyes to register environmental information along the river bank. Carolyn Hesse will adapt a floating, mirror-like installation that will animate the river's surface. Mandy Katz plans to develop a comprehensive field guide to plants of the Lower Schuylkill in consultation with the Philadelphia Botanical Society. Gabriel Kaprielian will create floating habitat pods that cultivate plants and attract river-dwelling animals. Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco will build a "bio-pool" - a passive floating form that will cleanse the river water it gathers. 

A series of weekend workshops at Bartram's Garden from April 29-June3 will feature each tool with the aim of promoting stewardship of the Lower Schuylkill River in and around Bartram’s Garden. Through these public events and related programs of PPEH, we invite you to participate in exploring how we all might learn to float–and to live and thrive–on warming and rising river waters. Climate prediction models agree that Philadelphia is becoming hotter and wetter. How can we best adapt to the higher temperatures and other extreme weather events that increasingly make up the new normal?  

To learn more about WetLand, read the Press Release, review Instructions for Living with WetLand and its Emergency Operations Procedures handbook.

Ecotopian Toolkit for Wetland: Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco
May
20
11:30 am11:30

Ecotopian Toolkit for Wetland: Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco

  • Bartram's Garden

After a successful 2016 pilot The PPEH Lab at Wetland returns as the focus of our Ecotopian Tools for WetLand public event series. Seven winning artists will facilitate community events to jam out prototypes for living on warmer waters, and your contributions are desired!

On Saturday, May 20, micro-grant winners Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco will introduce bio-pool. 

Read more about our adventures on our Floating Wetland blog!

This spring, several art and design installations will extend from Bartram's Garden Community Boathouse. Moored to the banks, and addressing the shoreline, they aim to influence the surrounding area. These installations are the result of an environmental design competition - Ecotopian Tools for WetLand - which began as a call for proposals and juried selection process. Winning toolmakers include Cecily Anderson, Joanne Douglas, Carolyn Hesse, Gabriel Kaprielian, Mandy Katz, Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco. Projects are situated to buoy the legacies of Bartram's Garden and WetLand - a boat that serves as a gathering place, art project and science lab- and timed to jibe with the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities' Ecotopian Toolkit conference, April 13-15

These prototypes for ecotopian tools will introduce strategies for inhabitants of the Lower Schuylkill watershed to consider as we learn to adapt and, in some cases, to float on warmer waters. Cecily Anderson will develop a map of the Lower Schuylkill that is receptive to user's inputs. Joanne Douglas will use fibers and dyes to register environmental information along the river bank. Carolyn Hesse will adapt a floating, mirror-like installation that will animate the river's surface. Mandy Katz plans to develop a comprehensive field guide to plants of the Lower Schuylkill in consultation with the Philadelphia Botanical Society. Gabriel Kaprielian will create floating habitat pods that cultivate plants and attract river-dwelling animals. Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco will build a "bio-pool" - a passive floating form that will cleanse the river water it gathers. 

A series of weekend workshops at Bartram's Garden from April 29-June3 will feature each tool with the aim of promoting stewardship of the Lower Schuylkill River in and around Bartram’s Garden. Through these public events and related programs of PPEH, we invite you to participate in exploring how we all might learn to float–and to live and thrive–on warming and rising river waters. Climate prediction models agree that Philadelphia is becoming hotter and wetter. How can we best adapt to the higher temperatures and other extreme weather events that increasingly make up the new normal?  

To learn more about WetLand, read the Press Release, review Instructions for Living with WetLand and its Emergency Operations Procedures handbook.

Ecotopian Toolkit for Wetland: Cecily Anderson and Joanne Douglas
Jun
3
11:30 am11:30

Ecotopian Toolkit for Wetland: Cecily Anderson and Joanne Douglas

  • Bartram's Garden

After a successful 2016 pilot The PPEH Lab at Wetland returns as the focus of our Ecotopian Tools for WetLand public event series. Seven winning artists will facilitate community events to jam out prototypes for living on warmer waters, and your contributions are desired!

On Saturday, June 6, micro-grant winner Cecily Anderson will collect input for a map of the changing Lower Schuylkill River and Joanne Douglas will lead a workshop about using textiles to register change in the tidal environment at Bartram Garden's annual River Fest.

Read more about our adventures on our Floating Wetland blog!

This spring, several art and design installations will extend from Bartram's Garden Community Boathouse. Moored to the banks, and addressing the shoreline, they aim to influence the surrounding area. These installations are the result of an environmental design competition - Ecotopian Tools for WetLand - which began as a call for proposals and juried selection process. Winning toolmakers include Cecily Anderson, Joanne Douglas, Carolyn Hesse, Gabriel Kaprielian, Mandy Katz, Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco. Projects are situated to buoy the legacies of Bartram's Garden and WetLand - a boat that serves as a gathering place, art project and science lab- and timed to jibe with the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities' Ecotopian Toolkit conference, April 13-15

These prototypes for ecotopian tools will introduce strategies for inhabitants of the Lower Schuylkill watershed to consider as we learn to adapt and, in some cases, to float on warmer waters. Cecily Anderson will develop a map of the Lower Schuylkill that is receptive to user's inputs. Joanne Douglas will use fibers and dyes to register environmental information along the river bank. Carolyn Hesse will adapt a floating, mirror-like installation that will animate the river's surface. Mandy Katz plans to develop a comprehensive field guide to plants of the Lower Schuylkill in consultation with the Philadelphia Botanical Society. Gabriel Kaprielian will create floating habitat pods that cultivate plants and attract river-dwelling animals. Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco will build a "bio-pool" - a passive floating form that will cleanse the river water it gathers. 

A series of weekend workshops at Bartram's Garden from April 29-June3 will feature each tool with the aim of promoting stewardship of the Lower Schuylkill River in and around Bartram’s Garden. Through these public events and related programs of PPEH, we invite you to participate in exploring how we all might learn to float–and to live and thrive–on warming and rising river waters. Climate prediction models agree that Philadelphia is becoming hotter and wetter. How can we best adapt to the higher temperatures and other extreme weather events that increasingly make up the new normal?  

To learn more about WetLand, read the Press Release, review Instructions for Living with WetLand and its Emergency Operations Procedures handbook.


Research Rivers Seminar
Apr
28
12:00 pm12:00

Research Rivers Seminar

Join us for the sixth meeting of the Research Rivers Seminar of the semester on April 28, 2017. 

Location: 12-1:30p in the Meyerson Conference Room, 2nd Floor, Van Pelt Library, Penn

 

In tandem with other LSRCorps initiatives, the River Research Seminar begins meeting is a collaborative place-based research seminar designed to build a core of regional scholars whose work explores the Schuylkill River and Philadelphia’s urban waters, connecting them across disciplines from hydrology to history. The seminar works closely with community partners whose collaboration also informs the seminar’s research questions and priorities.

The seminar is convened by Laurie Allen (Assistant Director of Digital Scholarship, Penn Libraries), Peter DeCarlo (Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry, Drexel University), Danielle Redden (Director of River Programs, Bartram’s Garden), and Bethany Wiggin (Associate Professor of German and Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities).

For more information contact director@ppehlab.org. 

Ecotopian Toolkit for Wetland: Joanne Douglas
Apr
25
9:30 am09:30

Ecotopian Toolkit for Wetland: Joanne Douglas

  • Bartram's Garden

After a successful 2016 pilot The PPEH Lab at Wetland returns as the focus of our Ecotopian Tools for WetLand public event series. Seven winning artists will facilitate community events to jam out prototypes for living on warmer waters, and your contributions are desired!

On May 27, micro-grant winner Joanne Douglas will lead a workshop about using textiles to register change in the tidal environment. 

Read more about our adventures on our Floating Wetland blog!

This spring, several art and design installations will extend from Bartram's Garden Community Boathouse. Moored to the banks, and addressing the shoreline, they aim to influence the surrounding area. These installations are the result of an environmental design competition - Ecotopian Tools for WetLand - which began as a call for proposals and juried selection process. Winning toolmakers include Cecily Anderson, Joanne Douglas, Carolyn Hesse, Gabriel Kaprielian, Mandy Katz, Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco. Projects are situated to buoy the legacies of Bartram's Garden and WetLand - a boat that serves as a gathering place, art project and science lab- and timed to jibe with the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities' Ecotopian Toolkit conference, April 13-15

These prototypes for ecotopian tools will introduce strategies for inhabitants of the Lower Schuylkill watershed to consider as we learn to adapt and, in some cases, to float on warmer waters. Cecily Anderson will develop a map of the Lower Schuylkill that is receptive to user's inputs. Joanne Douglas will use fibers and dyes to register environmental information along the river bank. Carolyn Hesse will adapt a floating, mirror-like installation that will animate the river's surface. Mandy Katz plans to develop a comprehensive field guide to plants of the Lower Schuylkill in consultation with the Philadelphia Botanical Society. Gabriel Kaprielian will create floating habitat pods that cultivate plants and attract river-dwelling animals. Jacob Rivkin and Eric Blasco will build a "bio-pool" - a passive floating form that will cleanse the river water it gathers. 

A series of weekend workshops at Bartram's Garden from April 29-June3 will feature each tool with the aim of promoting stewardship of the Lower Schuylkill River in and around Bartram’s Garden. Through these public events and related programs of PPEH, we invite you to participate in exploring how we all might learn to float–and to live and thrive–on warming and rising river waters. Climate prediction models agree that Philadelphia is becoming hotter and wetter. How can we best adapt to the higher temperatures and other extreme weather events that increasingly make up the new normal?  

To learn more about WetLand, read the Press Release, review Instructions for Living with WetLand and its Emergency Operations Procedures handbook.

"Can Scientists be Activists?" Keynote Lecture by James Hansen for Ecotopian Toolkit Conference
Apr
14
5:00 pm17:00

"Can Scientists be Activists?" Keynote Lecture by James Hansen for Ecotopian Toolkit Conference

  • Rainey Auditorium, Penn Museum

James Hansen (Director, Program on Climate Science, Awareness and Solutions, Earth Institute, Columbia University; former head of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies) delivers the second keynote lecture, "Can Scientists be Activists?" for the Ecotopian Toolkit for Anthropocene Challenges conference. 

This lecture draws attention to the ways that scientific research does or does not translate into ethical or political imperatives, drawing from Dr. Hansen’s controversial decision to leave his post as the head of NASA’s Goddard Institute to devote his time to political activism. He talks about the process of science and independent peer review in the context of rapid global climate change.

The lecture will be in Rainey Auditorium at the Penn Museum from 5-6:30pm on April 14. 

Presented by the Penn Humanities Forum.

For more information about the conference, please visit our official website.  

 

"Art, Disaster, Utopia" Keynote Lecture by Rebecca Solnit for Ecotopian Toolkit
Apr
13
5:00 pm17:00

"Art, Disaster, Utopia" Keynote Lecture by Rebecca Solnit for Ecotopian Toolkit

  • Harrison Auditorium, Penn Museum
"Bartram's Robot" by Mason Rosenthal. Photograph by Austin Bream. 

"Bartram's Robot" by Mason Rosenthal. Photograph by Austin Bream. 

Rebecca Solnit, writer, historian, environmental and human rights activist, gives the first keynote lecture, "Art Disaster, Utopia" for the Ecotopian Toolkit for Anthropocene Challenges conference. 

How might we translate natural and manmade disasters into opportunities for changed states of mind infused with utopian hope? This is one of the challenging questions Rebecca Solnit poses in her recent work. Eclectic, brilliant, widely celebrated, Solnit is an inspiration for people around the world. In her keynote address at the Penn Humanities Forum, she will speak to the broad concerns of this week’s conference-art, environment, utopia-drawing on her own highly distinctive toolkit as an author, activist, historian, and artist.

The lecture will take place at Harrison Auditorium in the Penn Museum from 5-6:30pm. For more information about the conference, visit our official website. 

Presented by the Penn Humanities Forum and Institute of Contemporary Art

Ecotopian Toolkit for Anthropocene Challenges
Apr
13
Apr 15

Ecotopian Toolkit for Anthropocene Challenges

Prompted in part by the 500th anniversary of Thomas More’s Utopia, we explore a longer history of the anthropocene to help represent–and respond to–our contemporary moment. At the outset of European imperial expansion across the globe, English humanist Thomas More dashed off an enduring work of speculative fiction, composed in two short parts: Utopia. The first part stages conversations between European intellectuals about the profound changes they were witnessing: the enclosure of commons, regimes of mineral extraction, shifting flows of capital, uneven resource access, and the criminalization of poverty among them. More’s second book voyages out to the island utopia: a republican community purportedly in possession of educational tools for a better life.

Utopia informs the conference’s organization: both its scholarly conversations and its future-looking tools for citizens. 

Over three days of meetings, we will consider how integrated knowledge production can address environmental challenges and what tools scholars and other professional in informal STEAM education might create—not only to maintain but to expand the potential for species-being in the Anthropocene, the age of the human. Scholarly presentations will intersect with live performance; longer invited presentations are punctuated by shorter interventions.  Our gathering hybridizes a scholarly conference with an inventors’ lab, a design workshop, and an experimental performance space. Together, we will create a Toolkit for the Anthropocene.

For a more information, please visit our official conference site

 

Earth and Environmental Science Senior Reseach Conference
Apr
12
Apr 19

Earth and Environmental Science Senior Reseach Conference

Penn staff, faculty, friends and family are invited to the 4 sessions of Earth and Environmental Science (EES) Senior Thesis Final Talks (April 12-19) and the EES Senior Research Conference (April 21). 

Senior Research Conference (SRC) APRIL 21 1:30-4:30pm

  • 1:30-3pm: Poster Session (all seniors) Hayden Hall 358
  • 3-4pm: “Final Four” Encore Talks—These are talks chosen by the seniors (TBA on April 20), to be given a second time as the finale to the Senior Research Conference. Hayden Hall 360

Reception to follow.


Final Talks (leading up to the SRC) All are invited and encouraged to attend.
Wednesday, April 12 (noon-1pm): Moore Room: 212

  • 12:00pm Tabeen Hossain: Food Connect: A Life Cycle Analysis. Research Mentor: Steven Finn, Co-Founder and Managing Partner, response Ecology; co-founder, Food Systems Seminar at the University of Pennsylvania
  • 12:15 Richard Alonso: Continental Translocation of Nutrients to Chesapeake Bay. Research Mentor:  Sarah Willig, Lecturer & Academic Advisor, Master of Environmental Studies Program
  • 12:30 Courtney Lang: Feeding Ecology of Pterois volitans in Key Largo. Research Mentor: Lauren Sallan, Assistant Professor, Earth and Environmental Science Department
  • 12:45 Camilla Davila: Impact of Public Transportation on Environmental Health Outcomes in the South Bronx & North Philadelphia. Research Mentor: Richard V. Pepino, Deputy Director, Community Outreach & Engagement Core, Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology

Thursday, April 13 (7-8:45pm): Location: CHEM: 119

  • 7:00pm Lauren Brunsdale: Land-use and Vegetation Change in the Ventura River Watershed, California using Remote Sensing. Research Mentor: : Jane E. Dmochowski, Senior Lecturer, Earth and Environmental Science Department
  • 7:15 Tanner Frank: Description of a leptoceratopsid dinosaur from the Lance Formation of Wyoming. Research Mentor: Peter Dodson, Professor of Paleontology, Department of Earth and Environmental Science, School of Arts and Sciences University of Pennsylvania
  • 7:30 Jennifer Anderson: Laboratory Deformation Experiments on Ice-Graphite Mixtures. Research Mentor: David L. Goldsby, Associate Professor, Earth and Environmental Science Department
  • 7:45 Berenice Leung: Assessing Price Sensitivity and Perception of Food in Norristown, Pennsylvania. Research Mentor: Steven M. Finn, Co-Founder, Managing Director, ResponsEcology; Affiliated Faculty, University of Pennsylvania

Tuesday, April 18 (7-8:45pm): Location: CHEM: 119

  • 7:00pm Gavriela Reiter: Evaluating the Externalities of The Philadelphia Energy Hub Transition: A GIS and Ethnographic Approach. Research Mentor: Jane Dmochowski, Senior Lecturer, University of Pennsylvania Department of Earth and Environmental Science
  • 7:15 Lauren Wang: Building a Sustainable Retail Supply Chain: Evaluation of Key Opportunities and Challenges. Research Mentor: Mark Mills,Director of Purchasing Services
  • 7:30 Indigo Catton: Changes in Philadelphia’s Urban Tree Canopy Cover from 1970-2010. Research Mentor: Lara Roman, Research Ecologist, US Forest Service Northern Field Station
  • 7:45: Zara Turner: Evaluating Philadelphia’s 2012 Lead Paint and Disclosure Law. Research Mentor: Richard V. Pepino, Deputy Director, Community Outreach & Engagement Core, Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology

Wednesday, April 19 (noon-1pm) Moore Room: 212

  • 12:00pm Oumourumana Jalloh: Integrating Sustainability into Supply Chains Decisions at Higher Education Institutions. Research Mentor: Mark Mills, Director of Purchasing Services
  • 12:15 Jamie Rosenstein: An Environmental Perspective: Asthma Prevalence, Education, and Disease Management amongst Athletes at the University of Pennsylvania. Research Mentor: Michael Kulik, Lecturer, Master of Environmental Studies
  • 12:30 Robert Feit: Modern Comparisons of the Moon and Mercury Using Secondary Craters. Research Mentor: Jennifer Whitten, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Earth and Planetary Studies, NASM
  • 12:45 Riley Burger: Rural Electrification in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Case Study of Kenya. Research Mentor: Andrew E. Hummler, Senior Lecturer, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Green Dock Build Out
Apr
2
11:00 am11:00

Green Dock Build Out

On April 2, PPEH Fellows will help build the docks for WetLand at Bartram's Garden in preparation for the spring! 

Research Rivers Seminar: Marilyn Howarth
Mar
31
12:00 pm12:00

Research Rivers Seminar: Marilyn Howarth

Join us for the fifth meeting of the Research Rivers Seminar of the semester on March 31, 2017. 

This week's presentation will be given by Dr. Marilyn Howarth (Penn). 

Location: TBD

 

In tandem with other LSRCorps initiatives, the River Research Seminar begins meeting is a collaborative place-based research seminar designed to build a core of regional scholars whose work explores the Schuylkill River and Philadelphia’s urban waters, connecting them across disciplines from hydrology to history. The seminar works closely with community partners whose collaboration also informs the seminar’s research questions and priorities.

The seminar is convened by Laurie Allen (Assistant Director of Digital Scholarship, Penn Libraries), Peter DeCarlo (Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry, Drexel University), Danielle Redden (Director of River Programs, Bartram’s Garden), and Bethany Wiggin (Associate Professor of German and Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities).

For more information contact director@ppehlab.org. 

Penn Birding goes for an early spring birding walk at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge
Mar
26
9:00 am09:00

Penn Birding goes for an early spring birding walk at John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge

  • John Heinz Wildlife Refuge

On Sunday, March 26, Penn Birding is going to John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge At Tinicum for an early spring bird walk led by a Heinz volunteer. This excursion is especially beginner-birder-friendly! If you don't have binoculars, you can borrow them from the Visitor Center.

Early Spring Birding at Heinz NWR
Sunday March 26 2017
9:00 AM Bird walk departs from Visitor Center
8601 Lindbergh Blvd., Philadelphia, PA 19153
RSVP at https://goo.gl/forms/vt1GA5vgIgTRwgmJ2

If you'd like to join Penn Birding & find out about future events, fill out the membership form here: http://goo.gl/forms/crnt2OYonY38GLDD2

Research Rivers Seminar: Peter DeCarlo, "Air Impacts from the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refinery"
Mar
17
12:00 pm12:00

Research Rivers Seminar: Peter DeCarlo, "Air Impacts from the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refinery"

Join us for the fourth meeting of the Research Rivers Seminar of the semester on March 17, 2017. 

This week's presentation will be given by co-convener of the Research Rivers Seminar,  Professor Peter DeCarlo (Drexel). 

Location: 12-1:30p in the Meyerson Conference Room, 2nd Floor, Van Pelt Library, University of Pennsylvania (3420 Walnut Street) 

"AIr Impacts from the Philadelphia Energy Solutions Refinery" 

Straddling the banks of the Lower Schuylkill River sits the largest refinery complex on the Eastern seaboard. Data on emissions from the refinery come from a variety of sources & databases, but this information does not provide quantitative pollutant concentrations & air quality degradation from the surrounding neighborhoods of Philadelphia. With the global recognition of the impacts of air quality on human health, studies to better understand local impacts of industrial activities add to our collective understanding. 

This talk brings together various datasets on refinery emissions & places them in the context of the air emissions from Philadelphia & activities related to statewide natural gas extraction in the Marcellus Shale. Emissions data is, in many cases, only an estimate of true emissions & measurements are required to determine the accuracy of these data. Since the river provides direct public access to the complex, high precision measurements of methane (CH4) & carbon dioxide (CO2) were made using a prototype battery powered backpack from a canoe. These measurements provide an initial demonstration of the value of air pollution measurements made from a human powered boat platform if appropriate instrumentation is available. Future measurement possibilities & platforms will be discussed. Of particular interest is distributing this information to the public in ways that aid in understanding the impacts of the refinery emissions& how these types of measurement may be used in other areas.

Dr. Peter DeCarlo is an Assistant Professor with a joint appointment in the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering and the Department of Chemistry at Drexel University. Dr. DeCarlo has a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Science from the University of Colorado, and a BS in Biochemistry from the University of Notre Dame. He uses state-of-the-art instrumentation to measure the chemical composition of particulates and gases in the atmosphere to better understand air quality and climate impacts of human emissions. He has made air quality and climate related measurements from planes, trucks, and stationary sites all over the world to better understand emissions, sources, and subsequent chemical reactions of pollutants in the atmosphere. Dr. DeCarlo is also interested in the intersection of science and policy, and was an AAAS Science Policy Fellow at the US EPA prior to starting his faculty position at Drexel. Funding for his research comes from the National Science Foundation, Electric Power Research Institute,  and the Department of Transportation. Dr. DeCarlo has co-authored over 80 peer-reviewed publications and has been identified as a highly cited researcher by Thompson Reuters (2014, 2015, and 2016). 

In tandem with other LSRCorps initiatives, the River Research Seminar begins meeting is a collaborative place-based research seminar designed to build a core of regional scholars whose work explores the Schuylkill River and Philadelphia’s urban waters, connecting them across disciplines from hydrology to history. The seminar works closely with community partners whose collaboration also informs the seminar’s research questions and priorities.

The seminar is convened by Laurie Allen (Assistant Director of Digital Scholarship, Penn Libraries), Peter DeCarlo (Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry, Drexel University), Danielle Redden (Director of River Programs, Bartram’s Garden), and Bethany Wiggin (Associate Professor of German and Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities).

For more information contact director@ppehlab.org. 

Shaunak Sen screening of "Cities of Sleep"
Mar
14
5:00 pm17:00

Shaunak Sen screening of "Cities of Sleep"

  • 401 Fisher Bennett Hall

Shaunak Sen will screen his award-winning recent documentary at 5 pm on Tuesday, March 14, 2017 in 401 Fisher-Bennett Hall. There will be a discussion with the director after the screening.

 

The documentary Cities of Sleep takes us into a heady world of insurgent sleepers' communities and the infamous "sleep mafia" in Delhi, where just securing a safe sleeping spot often becomes a question of life and death. The film traces the lives of two individuals, Shakeel and Ranjeet. Shakeel, a renegade homeless sleeper, has for the last seven years slept in a diverse range of improvised places like subways, under park benches, parking lots, abandoned cars and, most recently, at areas controlled by the sleep mafia. Ranjeet runs the “sleep-cinema” community at Loha Pul, a huge double-story iron bridge straddling the banks of the river Yamuna. A thin strip of land under Loha Pul houses shanty cinemas where over 400 homeless people sleep through the day for a nominal price. The flooding of the river Yamuna poses a threat to the people sleeping there each monsoon season. The film not only looks at the tremendous pressure that the need to find a safe place to sleep exerts on the homeless in the city, but also presents a broader philosophical exploration of sleep.

Shalini Kantayya: International Women’s Day and Global Distinguished Lecture
Mar
13
6:00 pm18:00

Shalini Kantayya: International Women’s Day and Global Distinguished Lecture

  • International House’s Ibrahim Theater

International Women’s Day

“A Drop of Life: The Global Water Crisis and It’s Unique Impact on Women” by Shalini Kantayya


In collaboration with the Middle East Center at Penn, the South Asia Center is planning for our annual International Women’s Day and Global Distinguished Lecture event on water security as a global issue at the International House's Ibrahim Theater. 

Shalini Kantayya is a filmmaker, educator, and eco-activist. She has released several films focusing on environmental issues that are commonly used as teaching tools on campuses and in communities locally and internationally. She has been featured on TEDx and will include a screening of her short documentary on water in her talk with us in March. You can find out more about her work here: http://shalinikantayya.net/about/

RSVP here if you are interested in attending. 

Research Rivers Seminar
Mar
3
12:00 pm12:00

Research Rivers Seminar

Join us for the third meeting of the Research Rivers Seminar of the semester on March 3, 2017. 

Location: 12-1:30p in the Meyerson Conference Room, 2nd Floor, Van Pelt Library, Penn

In tandem with other LSRCorps initiatives, the River Research Seminar begins meeting is a collaborative place-based research seminar designed to build a core of regional scholars whose work explores the Schuylkill River and Philadelphia’s urban waters, connecting them across disciplines from hydrology to history. The seminar works closely with community partners whose collaboration also informs the seminar’s research questions and priorities.

The seminar is convened by Laurie Allen (Assistant Director of Digital Scholarship, Penn Libraries), Peter DeCarlo (Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry, Drexel University), Danielle Redden (Director of River Programs, Bartram’s Garden), and Bethany Wiggin (Associate Professor of German and Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities).

For more information contact director@ppehlab.org. 

Research Rivers Seminar
Feb
17
12:00 pm12:00

Research Rivers Seminar

  • Van Pelt Library

Join us for the second Research Rivers Seminar meeting of the spring semester on February 17, 2017. 

Location: 12-1:30p in the Meyerson Conference Room, 2nd Floor, Van Pelt Library, Penn

The two presenters for this meetings include: 

-Howard Neukrug (Penn; formerly Philadelphia Water)

-Lauren Mandel (PLA, ASLA; Andropogon)

In tandem with other LSRCorps initiatives, the River Research Seminar begins meeting is a collaborative place-based research seminar designed to build a core of regional scholars whose work explores the Schuylkill River and Philadelphia’s urban waters, connecting them across disciplines from hydrology to history. The seminar works closely with community partners whose collaboration also informs the seminar’s research questions and priorities.

The seminar is convened by Laurie Allen (Assistant Director of Digital Scholarship, Penn Libraries), Peter DeCarlo (Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry, Drexel University), Danielle Redden (Director of River Programs, Bartram’s Garden), and Bethany Wiggin (Associate Professor of German and Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities).

For more information contact director@ppehlab.org. 

Penn Lightbulb Cafe: Forgotten Places, Unlikely Alliances, and Radical Hope on an Urban River
Feb
6
9:30 am09:30

Penn Lightbulb Cafe: Forgotten Places, Unlikely Alliances, and Radical Hope on an Urban River

  • World Cafe Live

Forgotten Places, Unlikely Alliances, and Radical Hope on an Urban River

By Professor Bethany Wiggin, Associate Professor of German and Founding Director of the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities

Tuesday, February 7, 2017
6–7 p.m.
World Cafe Live
3025 Walnut Street

The banks of the lower, tidal Schuylkill River in Philadelphia support both an oil refinery and a bird sanctuary. The river is home to the eastern seaboard's largest oil port, in operation since the 1870s, and long-standing residential neighborhoods. This talk explores the history of these entanglements, drawing on collaborations of artists, scientists, historians, community partners, and urban planners catalyzed by the WetLand Project, a floating lab for experiments in sustainability, moored at Bartram's Garden. And it asks, how we might hope to envision the future of this river and the many lives it sustains?

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. Contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu. 

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

www.upenn.edu/pennnews/sciencecafe

 

Research Rivers Seminar
Feb
3
Feb 4

Research Rivers Seminar

Join us for the first Research Rivers Seminar meeting of the new year on February 3, 2017. 

The following speakers will be sharing their with the seminar: 

  • Chris Streb (Biohabitats) 
  • David Velinsky (Academy of Natural Sciences / Drexel University )

Location: The Hill Conference Room is located in Room 240 in LeBow Engineering Center  31st and Market Streets . 

In tandem with other LSRCorps initiatives, the River Research Seminar begins meeting is a collaborative place-based research seminar designed to build a core of regional scholars whose work explores the Schuylkill River and Philadelphia’s urban waters, connecting them across disciplines from hydrology to history. The seminar works closely with community partners whose collaboration also informs the seminar’s research questions and priorities.

The seminar is convened by Laurie Allen (Assistant Director of Digital Scholarship, Penn Libraries), Peter DeCarlo (Assistant Professor of Environmental Engineering and Chemistry, Drexel University), Danielle Redden (Director of River Programs, Bartram’s Garden), and Bethany Wiggin (Associate Professor of German and Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities).

For more information contact director@ppehlab.org. 

 

Penn Birding "Indoor Birdwatching Field Trip"
Feb
2
6:30 pm18:30

Penn Birding "Indoor Birdwatching Field Trip"

Photo: Shereen Chang

Photo: Shereen Chang

Penn Birding is screening "Birds, birds, birds! An Indoor Birdwatching Field Trip", designed to improve our bird identification skills, by sight and by sound. RSVP at https://goo.gl/forms/49o2XZeBY0cQy6KD3. Sponsored by GAPSA.

Penn Birding promotes the appreciation and study of wild birds and their habitats through community, education, and other activities. To join & find out about future events, sign up here: http://goo.gl/forms/crnt2OYonY38GLDD2